Overlooked Classics: Danielle Dax- Jesus Egg That Wept

Danielle Dax has had an interesting career- she trained in opera in her youth; became a multi- instrumentalist and formed the experimental Lemon Kittens in the post-punk era, appeared as the Wolf Girl in Neil Jordan’s Company Of Wolves, went solo, and now works in interior design and art. Her second album is very muchContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: Danielle Dax- Jesus Egg That Wept”

Overlooked Classics: Bauhaus- In The Flat Field

We need to talk about Bauhaus. No, not the German art movement, although it’s hugely influential and important. The debut album from the English band is also the very first album ever released on 4AD. I feel Bauhaus are often unfairly dismissed as pretentious pretty boys and mere Goths, like a haircut that you growContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: Bauhaus- In The Flat Field”

Album Review: Sea Change- Mutual Dreaming

Norwegian producer and singer Ellen A W Sunde has produced yet another elusive, shining sad gem. Mutual Dreaming hits that half awake/half asleep tender spot. Her dreamy, often whispered vocals cast her as sonic somnambulist, and songs like Night Eyes, OK and the title track are like drowning in pixels. It’s elusive, warped and prettyContinue reading “Album Review: Sea Change- Mutual Dreaming”

Overlooked Classics: The Birthday Party- Junkyard

Few albums sound like their cover art. Junkyard is one such record. The follow-up to debut Prayers on Fire, it’s a riot. The Birthday Party were like a marauding razor gang. Every track is a little electric shock: pure viciousness, matching the Ed Roth/ Dave Christensen artwork. GrIpped by drugs and demons, the Australian post-punkContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: The Birthday Party- Junkyard”

Album Review: Boris-W

For well over two decades, Japanese experimental doom band Boris have been treading their own path, through line-up and label changes. Too avant-garde for the mainstream, they nonetheless have a loyal fan- base, not least because of working alongside collaborators like Sunn 0))). This, their first album for Sacred Bones, has enough light and shadeContinue reading “Album Review: Boris-W”

Oh! Brother Podcast

You have probably gathered by now (especially if you read our previous blog The Tempo House) that we’re fans of The (Mighty) Fall. So I thought it was time to write about the podcast which references all things concerning The Fall, Oh! Brother. Hosted by the band’s classic rhythm section, Paul and Steve Hanley, theyContinue reading “Oh! Brother Podcast”

Overlooked Classics: That Dog (1993)

That Dog’s debut eponymous album is just the epitome of perfection to me. The combination of indie pop and strange classical and jazz elements is still quite unlike anything I’ve heard. The band are perhaps like a less brutal Miranda Sex Garden, or softer Slits or Raincoats. Songs- and harmonies- don’t quite go where theyContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: That Dog (1993)”

Album Review: Sanctuary

A mighty collaboration between the Colombian composer Jose Parody and Grayson Sanders and Leviticus Penner, Sanctuary Vol. 1 and 2 is steeped in the kind of quietude that is neither comforting nor kind, but still incredibly beautiful. Truth is meditative, sparse and features voices that weave in and out drones. Smoke In The Halls isContinue reading “Album Review: Sanctuary”

Siouxsie and the Banshees’ Once Upon A Time Is 40

Siouxsie and The Banshees emerged fully formed from the punk scene- Siouxsie Sioux and Steve Severin were part of the Bromley Contingent who followed the Sex Pistols- and gained notoriety for a spiky, atonal and extended version of The Lord’s Prayer during the spit, vomit and snot heyday. However, by the time of this, theContinue reading “Siouxsie and the Banshees’ Once Upon A Time Is 40”

A John Waters Christmas

Good taste? Bad taste? It’s all so subjective, dahhling. One man who has no such quibbles in these matters is peerless movie director John Waters. As befits the man dubbed The Pope of Trash by William S Burroughs, Waters’ seasonal picks are as kitsch and hilarious as many of his films. Not for him, theContinue reading “A John Waters Christmas”