I Blame Robert Smith…

At fourteen, I was a bona fide Goth. Black of eyeliner, crimped of hair, and with a tendency towards a shyness and melancholy. Small-town life in rural Perthshire just wasn’t cutting it for me. I wanted to see bands, dance and theatre, but there was nothing within the vicinity and we were a working classContinue reading “I Blame Robert Smith…”

This Nation’s Saving Grace: The First Time The Fall Flirted With Pop

There’s something wonderfully opaque about The Fall’s This Nation’s Saving Grace. No change there, you might say, but I’ve got a theory about this. Their eighth album is a strange one, but it’s incredible. It seems like the more commercial they tried to sound, the more the twinkling keyboards and big fat riffs drew attentionContinue reading “This Nation’s Saving Grace: The First Time The Fall Flirted With Pop”

Overlooked Classics: Danielle Dax- Jesus Egg That Wept

Danielle Dax has had an interesting career- she trained in opera in her youth; became a multi- instrumentalist and formed the experimental Lemon Kittens in the post-punk era, appeared as the Wolf Girl in Neil Jordan’s Company Of Wolves, went solo, and now works in interior design and art. Her second album is very muchContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: Danielle Dax- Jesus Egg That Wept”

Overlooked Classics: Bauhaus- In The Flat Field

We need to talk about Bauhaus. No, not the German art movement, although it’s hugely influential and important. The debut album from the English band is also the very first album ever released on 4AD. I feel Bauhaus are often unfairly dismissed as pretentious pretty boys and mere Goths, like a haircut that you growContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: Bauhaus- In The Flat Field”

Overlooked Classics: The Birthday Party- Junkyard

Few albums sound like their cover art. Junkyard is one such record. The follow-up to debut Prayers on Fire, it’s a riot. The Birthday Party were like a marauding razor gang. Every track is a little electric shock: pure viciousness, matching the Ed Roth/ Dave Christensen artwork. GrIpped by drugs and demons, the Australian post-punkContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: The Birthday Party- Junkyard”

What Is Goth?

What is Goth? I see Goths all over Instagram,generally doing excessive glam make up tutorials, but as an old, and old school, Goth, it leaves me feeling somewhat alienated. Have they ever even heard Fields of the Nephilim or Sisters of Mercy? I suspect not. Young people, eh?!? Inspired by the spiky grandeur of art,Continue reading “What Is Goth?”

Always Tip The Waitresses

Before Wet Leg, Dry Cleaning and sundry damp post-punk/ new wave- inspired bands so beloved by Lammo etc, there was a band formed by a bunch of Ohio misfits, The Waitresses. Effortlessly cool, the band fused skronky saxophone, a la No Wave band James Chance and The Contortions, with pop sensibilities. When Chris Butler, whoContinue reading “Always Tip The Waitresses”

Oh! Brother Podcast

You have probably gathered by now (especially if you read our previous blog The Tempo House) that we’re fans of The (Mighty) Fall. So I thought it was time to write about the podcast which references all things concerning The Fall, Oh! Brother. Hosted by the band’s classic rhythm section, Paul and Steve Hanley, theyContinue reading “Oh! Brother Podcast”

Overlooked Classics: That Dog (1993)

That Dog’s debut eponymous album is just the epitome of perfection to me. The combination of indie pop and strange classical and jazz elements is still quite unlike anything I’ve heard. The band are perhaps like a less brutal Miranda Sex Garden, or softer Slits or Raincoats. Songs- and harmonies- don’t quite go where theyContinue reading “Overlooked Classics: That Dog (1993)”

A John Waters Christmas

Good taste? Bad taste? It’s all so subjective, dahhling. One man who has no such quibbles in these matters is peerless movie director John Waters. As befits the man dubbed The Pope of Trash by William S Burroughs, Waters’ seasonal picks are as kitsch and hilarious as many of his films. Not for him, theContinue reading “A John Waters Christmas”